Australia

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Contents

Introduction

This section needs more information.

History

Below is a timeline of fandom related events that took place in Australia.

1974

1975

  • While the first Kirk/Spock story may have been published the previous year, more material was out there and not getting published. The general community did not seem overly receptive to romance and in particular, that pairing. Diane Marchant would address this pairing in an essay in Grup #4. There was a follow discussion to this essay in the Star Trek letterzine, Halkan Council. This did not lead to a glut of these stories being privately circulated being published in fanzines. Rather, many would continue their trips underground, in some cases not being published for another ten to fifteen years.

1979

1980

  • By 1980, the Australian component of the fandom was going through a Mary Sue phase that other communities had gone through before. This period involved the writing of a Mary Sues with these stories being published in a number of fanzines. (Sweet Mary Sue) One example dates to 1982. In November of 1982, "The Price of Freedom," by Sylvia White, was published in Orbit 1. According to Sarah Berry, this was one of "the world's longest 'Mary Sue's'."

1982

  • Centro started being published. This Blake's 7 letterzine was edited by Nicki White out of Australia. The zine would have over seventy-five volumes.

1985

1987

2001

2003

2004

2005

  • On February 16, 2005, the CSI LiveJournal community aus_csi was created for Australian fans of the show. [4]
  • In March 2005, SkyHawke, an automated fan fiction archive with a large Harry Potter user base, banned all fan fiction with chan, that is fan fiction featuring minors engaged in sex acts, from their site in response to a legal situation in Australia that made this material illegal.

2006

2007

Google.Au's Webmaster stats for FanHistory.Com on May 15, 2007 for Australia.
Fanhistory.com Google webmaster information. Dated July 9, 2007. Australia.

This section needs more information.

Google Keywords: FanHistory WebMaster Tools: Period: December 15 to December 21, 2007 for Australia.

2008

  • Members of Australian fanfic and fanart communities continued to be worried over the effect of access systems declaration which ""places obligations on all content service providers to check that individuals accessing restricted content provided in Australia are at least 15 years of age for MA15+ content or 18 years of age for R18+ content". [6][7] They were worried what the impact of this would be on their fannish activities and how archivists would deal with this issue as it relates to Australian fans. [8][9]

2009

Canon Release Dates

Below is a partial timeline of canon release dates in Australia.

1960s

1970s

1980s

1990s

2000s

Fan Culture

yin-of-all-trades made the following characteristic of people from Australia which could be related to fans from the country:

Plurk versus Twitter. Cultural differences. Singaporeans = collectivist society. We’re more for forums and creating threads and engaging in discussion whereas our Western (and Australian) counterparts are more inclined to Twitter’s simplistic concept. Plurk is just too confusing and complicating. [23]

Sports

According to From Broadcast Scarcity to Digital Plenitude: The Changing Dynamics of the Media Sport Content Economy, Brett Hutchins and David Rowe, Television New Media 2009; 10; 354 originally published online Apr 14, 2009; DOI: 10.1177/1527476409334016:

The Foxtel chief executive officer, Kim Williams, announced in March 2006 that there was no regulatory impediment to broadband internet providers exercising exclusive rights over an entire sport and observed that online providers are not required to adhere to content regulations contained in the Broadcasting Services act 1992 (as amended) (Murray 2006). These comments represent an open acknowledgment of the proliferation and accelerating popularity of broadband “television channels,” implying that they are direct competitors with Foxtel, the home of the pay television channel Fox Sports.


According to From Broadcast Scarcity to Digital Plenitude: The Changing Dynamics of the Media Sport Content Economy, Brett Hutchins and David Rowe, Television New Media 2009; 10; 354 originally published online Apr 14, 2009; DOI: 10.1177/1527476409334016 page 10, in 2006 Cricket Australia provided free clips and highlights on their website to Australians and charged international users to view them. Online news sources including News Limited, Fairfax, and Yahoo!7 inside Australia used three minutes of that video (standard length of Australian news segment) on their website. Cricket Australia threatened to sue them for any more than 40 seconds and threatened to ban online journalists from covering their events. Cricket Australia's position was that they were acting as "defacto television stations." According to this article, there remains uncertain copyright issues and how to apply existing laws to online sports coverage.


According to From Broadcast Scarcity to Digital Plenitude: The Changing Dynamics of the Media Sport Content Economy, Brett Hutchins and David Rowe, Television New Media 2009; 10; 354 originally published online Apr 14, 2009; DOI: 10.1177/1527476409334016 page 13, Australian cricketers have been encouraged to personally promote themselves as athletes. They wanted tight control over the management of a player's image. "This trend toward tightly controlled image management has also caused problems for the ACA when it discovered fake satirical profiles of national representative players on the social networking site MySpace (Conn 2007).7"


See also:

Australian fans

Results of an April 2005 survey on FanDomination.Net regarding where members from from: United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Germany, France, New Zealand.

Below is a list of members of the fan community who were from Australia. The list is sorted first by fandom and then alphabetically.

Blake's 7

Doctor Who

Star Trek

Star Wars

Fanzines

See Fanzines published in Australia.

Conventions

See Conventions in Australia.

External Links

This section needs more information.

See Also

Sources

Below is a partial list of articles and academic sources to help you continue to learn about this community.

  • Australian Science Fiction Appreciation Society. (1988). Australian & New Zealand science fiction fandom guide. Penrith, N.S.W.: Australian Science Fiction Appreciation Society.
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