Lord of the Rings

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Contents

Introduction

This section needs more information.

The Author

Main article: J. R. R. Tolkien

The Canon

See also Tolkien's_legendarium#Canon.

This section needs more information.

Terminology

Below is a list of terms and their definitions that are used in this fan community.

This section needs more information.


Timeline

Below is a partial timeline of events that took place in the Lord of the Rings fandom.

1960s

1966

  • A young writer named Joy Hill sent a note to J. R. R. Tolkien asking if the writer can have permission to write stories using the names of characters from Lord of the Rings and write a sequel. J. R. R. Tolkien responded that he would forward the request on to his lawyers but, basically, it was not going to happen. [1]

1969

  • The first issue of Mythlore the informal zine that would later become a scholarly journal, was published in January 1969. [2]
  • Lord of the Rings fan fiction was being circulated in fanzines. One zine fan fiction appeared in was Hoom. It had four or five issues. [3]

1970s

  • Back in the day, some fen who did not like the Sam/Frodo pairing were accused of homophobia. (shilohmm, 05-12-2003, 01:36 PM, [4]


1980s

1982

  • During the 1980s, there was wank in the Swedish speaking Lord of the Rings fandom over the quality of the translation. It was so abysmal that fans protested and demanded someone else to re-translate it. After a fire in his house in 1982, the first translator then incoherently said Tolkien fans did it, and that Tolkien was a black-magic Nazi who conspired with traitors. Tolkien responded to complaints saying:
The enclosure that you brought from Almqvist &c. was both puzzling and irritating. A letter in Swedish from fil. dr. Åke Ohlmarks, and a huge list (9 pages foolscap) of names in the L.R. which he had altered. I hope that my inadequate knowledge of Swedish - no better than my kn. of Dutch, but I possess a v. much better Dutch dictionary! - tends to exaggerate the impression I received. (Swedish Wikipedia)
The impression remains, nonetheless, that Dr. Ohlmarks is a conceited person, less competent than charming Max Schuchart, though he thinks much better of himself. (Letters, 263) (Swedish Wikipedia)

1984 to 1988

  • Personal computers, aided by their word processing programs, started to have an impact on the publication of fanzines. They, along with the growth of coping services, led to a growth in the number of fanzines and created a situation where more fen could produce their own, high quality fanzines. (Langley)

1985 to 1995

  • The Lord of the Rings fandom was so phobic of Mary Sues that the inclusion of any original female character in a story, no matter how minor the character, the story was likely to be rejected for having a Mary Sue.

1990s

1994

  • The Lord of the Rings fan fiction community discussed J. R. R. Tolkien's views on fan fiction, the Tolkien estate's position on fan fiction, quality issues pertaining to fan fiction and the legal and moral implications of fan fiction and compared policies and actions to other fan fiction communities. This discussion took place on rec.arts.books.tolkien.

1998

1999

2000s

2000

"There were 22 Lord of the Rings stories published in 2000 (at least 22 still remain in the archives). Of these, 6 of them (all by the same author) dealt only with Aragorn relationships. He has an ongoing thing with Halbarad, and 2 episodes with Eomer. Slash content: 6 out of 22 stories = 27%"
  • Posters on the alt.fan.tolkien newsgroup began work on a massive round robin parody of LOTR, called the E-text. They would spend the next two years on this project.

2001

"I'd like to divide this into "Before" and "After" the movie. Pre-movie: 197 stories published. Slash content: 15 out of 197 = 7% Slash breakdown: Frodo/Sam - 1 for sure, 3 sweet "romance" types that may or may not be read as slash Frodo/Orc - 2 rape stories Frodo/Gandalf - 2 (same author) Frodo/Pippin - 1 Other Pairing - 6 (focused on Aragorn or various elves, only 1 Legolas) So if you count all the slash or could-be slash stories (rape, sweet, etc.) you get 9 with Frodo (4 with Sam) and 6 with others, 15 total. Post-movie: 135 stories published. Slash content: 17 out of 135 = 12% I like to call this "the explosion." From December 18 to the end of the year, 135 stories were published in 13 days. Even though the official release date of FOTR was Dec 19, I think some people were watching a midnight or early version, because the very first story on the explosion bulge is a Frodo/Sam labeled "Sapphire Eyes." Slash breakdown: Frodo/Sam - 3 for sure, 2 sweet "romance" types that may or may not be read as slash Frodo/Other - Frodo/Merry, Frodo/Legolas, Frodo/Aragorn = 3 Aragorn/Boromir - Erendis was right, 1st appearance here, 3 stories Other - 6 (various) Totals: 8 with Frodo (5 with Sam), and 9 for other characters, 17 total."
  • On December 19, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, the first part of Peter Jackson's film trilogy, was released in theaters, and generally received high to superb reviews.

2001 to 2003

  • Between December 2001 and December 2003, the Lord of the Rings slash fan fiction community began a massive expansion after the release of The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring. ( Elance: [14])

2002

"2002 (Jan) 8958 stories were published this year. I abandoned trying to break them down as I had the earlier years, or I would have had to read far too many stories (many summaries are pretty vague). Instead, I took a sample of 200 stories (pushing from Dec. 31 straight into January), looking for slash content as I have defined above. I included obvious parodies in my slash list (for example, there's a whole series of "[somebody] Woke Up Gay" that I included as slash). Slash content: 32 out of 200 stories = 16% 2002 (midyear) I jumped to the middle of the giant bulk of stories somewhere and took another random 8-page sample. Slash content: 18 out of 200 stories = 9%"

2003

"2003 (in progress)

9178 stories were published so far. LOTR fanfic continues to grow daily. BTW I can't duplicate these results; Fanfiction.net has changed their story display slightly and the total number of entries has gone down (they've probably eliminated some duplicate postings). Whatever, here's my random 8-page sample from currently posted stories.
Slash content: 10 out of 200 stories = 5%"

2003 and 2004

  • The Lord of the Rings fandom continued a tradition of giving out fan fiction awards on-line. In 2003 and 2004, the Mithril Awards were given out in the Lord of the Rings fan fiction community.

2004

[28]

2005

2006

2007

January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

2008

Fandom

Fan Fiction

Lord of the Rings fan fiction had been written since the 1960s but the quantity was generally small and unremarkable. It was not noted for pushing the envelope for things that could be done with fan fiction. The Lord of the Rings fandom of that era also had issues in trying to decide if it should follow tradition of pastiche or following the science fiction fandom's zine traditions. The early community was also stymied by J. R. R. Tolkien's ambivilence towards fan fiction. An early example of this attitude dates to 1966 when a young writer named Joy Hill sent a note to J. R. R. Tolkien asking if the writer could have permission to write stories using the names of characters from Lord of the Rings and write a sequel. J. R. R. Tolkien responded that he would forward the request on to his lawyers but, basically, it was not going to happen. [75]

By 1969, Lord of the Rings fan fiction was being clearly circulated in fanzines. One zine fan fiction appeared in was Hoom. It had four or five issues. [76]

This changed with the release of the movie. By the end of the year of 2002, there were 8,958 Lord of the Rings stories published on FanFiction.Net. [77] By the end of 2003, there were 9,178 Lord of the Rings stories published on FanFiction.Net. [78]

rickybuchanan on LiveJournal [79] said that "New canon appearing in a different medium, especially if it re-tells existing canon with changes, brings HUGE old vs new fan divides and wank potential."

Kerfluffles

FanLib

See FanLib for details regarding this fandom fight.

Influential fanworks

The work of Camilla Sandman, the Official Fanfic University of Middle Earth, is one of the famed works of the LOTR community. Due to its success, the OFUM was then adapted for dozen of fandoms, including Star Wars and Harry Potter. [80]


Fandom Members

See Category:Lord of the Rings fans.


Fandom size

November 2006

As of November 22, 2006 there are 234 stories on Twisting the Hellmouth [81] and 39,001 stories on FanFiction.Net. [82]

May 2007

As of May 23, 2007, there are 166 Lord of the Rings stories on FanLib. [83]

August 2007

As of August 19, 2007, there are 81 stories on FanLib.

December 2007

As of December 8, 2007, the total number of Lord of the Rings stories on FanLib was at 130.

As of December 15, 2007, there are 5 stories on FanWorks.Org [84] and 22 on MediaMiner.Org. [85]

External Links

LiveJournal

See also

Sources

Below is a partial list of articles and academic sources to help you continue to learn about this community.

  • Auden, W. H., Becker, A., Green, M., & Kirk, T. (2000). A Tolkien treasury : stories, poems, and illustrations celebrating the author and his world. Philadelphia: Courage Books.
  • Birzer, B. J. (2002). J.R.R. Tolkien's sanctifying myth understanding Middle-Earth. [Wilmington, Del.]: ISI Books.
  • Chance, J. (1992). The lord of the rings the mythology of power. Twayne's masterwork studies, no. 99. New York: Twayne.
  • Isaacs, N. D., & Zimbardo, R. A. (1968). Tolkien and the critics; essays on J.R.R. Tolkien's The lord of the rings. Notre Dame [Ind.]: University of Notre Dame Press.
  • Loyd Case "The Death of Fandom". ExtremeTech. August 2007. FindArticles.com. 03 Dec. 2007. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_zdext/is_200708/ai_n19427213
  • Mathijs, E. (2006). The Lord of the Rings popular culture in global context. London: Wallflower.
  • Mueller, E. (2001, December 25). The fellowship of the (Web) ring. The Advocate. Retrieved October 18, 2002, from http://www.findarticles.com/cf_0/m1589/2001_Dec_25/83451258/print.jhtml
  • Shefrin, Elana. "Lord of the Rings, Star Wars, and participatory fandom: mapping new congruencies between the internet and media entertainment culture" Critical Studies in Media Communication 21.3 (2004). 16 Jan. 2008 <http://www.informaworld.com/10.1080/0739318042000212729>
  • Stanton, M. N. (2001). Hobbits, elves, and wizards exploring the wonders and worlds of J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the rings". New York: St. Martin's Press.
  • Thompson, Kristin. "Tolkien on Film: Essays on Peter Jackson's "The Lord of the Rings" (review)" Tolkien Studies - Volume 3, 2006, pp. 222-228
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